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Click on the Icons for Schematics in PDF or GIF format.

Parts List:

These assembly instructions are aimed at getting a minimum development system running with a 20 pin AT90S2313-10-PC  working, in conjunction with the programming software, which is a free, demo, fully featured, (not crippled) Basic Compiler. The only limitation is the 2K code size, however this just happens to be the same size as the AT90S2313 code space.

Parts Required:

Power Supply Section:

You will need a suitable power supply (plug pack/wall wart) that will supply 9 to 12 Volts AC or DC @300ma or more, to power this unit up. As the input has a diode bridge, it isn't polarity conscious, so an AC or DC supply can be used.  There is no power supply included in the kit or assembled and tested unit, as these can be usually purchased locally for less than the cost of postage, and will be designed to match local input voltages and power outlets available. EG: 120/240 AC.

PCB   1 x DT006A

VR1   1 x 7805 +5 Voltage regulator in TO-220 case.
      1 x Suitable heat sink for above Regulator.
D1    1 x Diode Bridge D1 WO2 (or WO4 type)
J4    1 x 2.5mm (or 2.1mm) DC Input plug. PCB mount.
C1    1 x Capacitor 1000uf Electrolytic @25 Volts. (PCB type mount.)
C2    1 x Capacitor .01uf (or .1uf) Ceramic or Monolithic
C3    1 x Capacitor 10uf Electrolytic (PCB mount.) or Tant. @16 V.
C4    1 x Capacitor .01uf (or .1uf) Ceramic or Monolithic

LED10 1 x 3mm LED. PWR monitor
R15   1 x Resistor 1K .25 watt
Programmer and Micro Section:

U3    1 x AT90S2313-10-PC 10Mhz 20 pin DIP
X1    1 x 3 leg resonator to suit Micro Speed.

A 10Mhz Crystal and two 22pf ceramic Caps can be fitted
as an alternative to X1. The caps are installed at locations C9 and C10
Don't fit the caps if you are installing the resonator.
(15-30pf are suitable, resonators have 30pf caps internal)

A 20 pin machine pin socket should be fitted to the U3 location.
This will enable this Micro to be removed, if an 8 or 28 pin micro is
to be installed.

A 3 pin machine pin socket, or strip, can be used for the X1 location.
This will allow you to fit other value resonators.
If you can't find a strip, a 3 pin one can be cut from a
machine pin socket.

J7    1 x DB-25 Male right angle PCB mount connector.
R2    1 x Resistor  330R .25 watt
R3    1 x Resistor  330R .25 watt
R4    1 x Resistor  330R .25 watt

SW1   1 x 4 leg push-button Switch.
C12   1 x Capacitor 4.7uf to 10uf Electrolytic or Tantalum.
R17   1 x Resistor  10K .25 watt

Serial Communications Section:

U1    1 x MAX-232 E2 (or equivalent)
      You may chose to use a 16 pin socket for the Max-232

C5    1 x 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
C6    1 x 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
C7    1 x 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
C8    1 x 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
J6    1 x DB-9 right angle PCB mount connector.

Input/Output Section:

R1     1 x Resistor  1K .25 watt
R14    1 x Resistor  1K .25 watt
SW2    1 x 4 leg push-button Switch.
SW3    1 x 4 leg push-button Switch.

R6-R13 1 x RN1 1K resistor network. 10 pin device.
            1 common pin. (10P9R-1K)
Alternatively, if a resistor network is difficult to source,
this could be 8 individual resistors installed standing
upright on the board.

LED2-9 8 x 3mm LEDs. 
J9     1 x set of male header pins at .1" centers. (8 x 2 format)
TL8    8 x .1" test links.
Final Touch:

4 x 12mm square .5" stick on rubber feet. Adds a nice finish.


Optional Items: (not needed to get the basic unit going)

Kanda Compatible Connector:

J10   10 pin IDC Connector. (2 x 5 male header).
LED1  1 x 3mm LED.
R5    1 x Resistor  1K .25 watt

AVCC: (Used for A/D 28 pin Micros)

C11   1 x Capacitor .1uf (100nf) Ceramic
R16   1 x Resistor 100R .25 watt

Extension of SimmStick Bus:

J1    1 x 30 pin female R/A header strip.
      If you use these, make sure you solder the
      female connector to the DT006 board.

J2-3  1 x dual 30 pin Simm Socket.

See: simcon.html

J1 Will allow you to very simply connect to a proto or vero board for outboard development.
J2-3 As you will find, you generally can't get two SimmSticks into two adjoining Simm Sockets unless all components are surface mounted, so you would normally use the J3 position for a SimmStick. As single and dual sockets are about the same price, we have allowed for a dual to be used in this position.

Additional Jumper Options:

J5        Serial in/out crossover to Simm Bus.
          4 pin (2 x 2) header. Two Links.
          We have found it is easier for most kit builders
          to install a link, than cut a track, so these links
          are default open.

          To be able to use serial comms to a SimmStick via the Simm Bus,
          you will have to link J5 correctly. For direct connection,
          link pin 1 to pin 2, and pin 3 to pin 4. This means the links
          must be horizontal. To swap the RX/TX signals, simply position
          them vertical.

J8        4 pin (2 x 2) header. Unused signals of Max-232. Not used.

J11-12    2 x 3 pin headers. Two test links. Used to configure
          Int/Ext OSC pins of an 8 pin Micro. Extends to Simmbus.

J13       1 x 3 pin header. 1 test Link. Configure AREF to VCC
          for 28 pin micro.

J14       MOSI/MISO in/out crossover to Simm Bus.
          4 pin (2 x 2) header. Two Links.
          This is also D5 and D6 to the Simm Bus.
          We have found it is easier for most kit builders
          to install a link, than cut a track, so these links
          are default open.

          To be able to program a SimmStick via the Simm Bus,
          you will have to link:
          J14 pin 1 to pin 2, and
          J14 pin 3 to pin 4.
          This means the links must be
          horizontal, or point towards the Simm socket.

          If you need to swap these signals, simply position
          them vertical.

          If you wish to use D5 and D6 on the Simm Socket,
          or extended Simm Bus,
          you will have to link:
          J14 pin 1 to pin 2, and
          J14 pin 3 to pin 4.

And you can't have dual Micros, and dual +5Volt power supplies. You must remove them so the count is one. You can't run two micros in parallel, and you can't program two in parallel.
Alternative Micros:

U2        Used for  8 pin micro installation.
U4        Used for 28 pin micro installation.


    Assembly Instructions:

    We have been designing and manufacturing boards for many years now, so hopefully, we are starting to get it right.
     

  • All the positives of  polarized capacitors point to the top of the board.
  • All LEDs have the anode to the top of the board. The cathodes have a flat edge on one side of the plastic, this points towards the bottom of the board.
  • Items like switches that can be inserted into the board in two, and sometimes 4 different ways, we have run the tracks, so that it doesn't matter which way you install them.
  • Four poster header pins and Links. The artwork has been done so that installing links in the horizontal or vertical position, will logically cross over the connection.
  • All options at link positions have the links factory set to open. As our own experience has shown, users would prefer to put in a set of posts and links, or even solder in a wire link, rather than cut a track on a board.
  • The resistor network, should be a 9 pin for 8 resistors, but you can't get them, so it's a 10 pin device. You will see an extra dummy hole at one end of the artwork at this position to allow for this. Again, we have connected +5V to this dummy hole so it doesn't matter which way it is installed, as long as it is a 9 resistor network. We have also allowed for 8 individual resistors to be installed if you have trouble getting a resistor network. This means standing the resistors up from the board, so that one leg is bent over the body of the resistor. The 8 resistors are placed into 2 holes in the vertical position, so that one end of each resistor connects to +5V.

  •  
  • Read note below regarding resitor network installation.

  •  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Install The Components:
    As a general rule, the lowest height components should be installed into the board first, as this will make installation much easier.

    Install the crystal 3 pin socket, and the 20 pin machine pin socket into the U3 position. Install a 16 pin socket for U1 if you wish to. This may be a good choice for a beginner.
    Instead of saying "Install this into that" here is the general order of the rest of installation procedure:

    Resistor Network (10P9R-1K). Alternatively, if a resistor network is difficult to source, this could be 8 individual resistors installed standing upright on the board.
     

  • NOTE *****   The spacing between the resistor network and the Simm Socket is very tight. It may pay to install the resistor network last. You may even need to cut a little off the end of the resistor network with a pair of side cutters. Bear in mind that the last resistor isn't used.

  •  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Resistors R1-1K, R2-330R, R3-330R, R4-330R, R14-1K, R15-1K, and R17-10K.
    C2-Capacitor .01uf (or .1uf) Ceramic
    C3-Capacitor 10uf Electrolytic (PCB mount.) or Tant. @16 V.
    C4-Capacitor .01uf (or .1uf) Ceramic
    C5-Capacitor 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
    C6-Capacitor 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
    C7-Capacitor 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
    C8-Capacitor 1uf Electrolytic or Tantalum cap for Max-232.
    C12-Capacitor 4.7uf to 10uf Tantalum.
    LED 2 to LED 9 (8) 3mm.
    LED 10 3mm.

    This pretty well covers the low profile components, so the order of the rest of the items isn't all that important.

    Components Left To Install:
    C1-1000uf Electrolytic @25 Volts
    VR1-7805 +5 Voltage regulator in TO-220 case, and Suitable heat sink for the Regulator.
    D1-Diode Bridge D1 WO2 (or WO4 type)
    J4-2.5mm (or 2.1mm) DC Input plug. PCB mount.
    J6-DB-9 right angle PCB mount connector.
    J7-DB-25 Male right angle PCB mount connector.
    SW1-4 leg push-button Switch.
    SW2-4 leg push-button Switch.
    SW3-4 leg push-button Switch.
    J9-Set of male header pins at .1" centers. (8 x 2 format)

    Final Touch:
    4 x 12mm square (or round) .5" stick on rubber feet. Adds a nice finish. Stick in the four corners of the solder side of the DT006 board.

    Micros and Configuration:
    Install:
    U3-AT90S2313-10-PC 10Mhz 20 pin DIP
    X1-10Mhz 3 leg resonator.
    U1-MAX-232 E2 (or equivalent)

    TL8- 8 x .1" test links. These are installed on the J9 header posts.
    In order to get all 8 LEDs to flash, all 8 links will need to be installed, however as Data signals D5, D6, and D7 (the last 3 links) may upset the programming signals, you will need to remove these 3 links, and sit them over just one pin of the header, not 2 pins, during the programming phase.

    Initial Power up and Testing:
    Remove the micro if you have it installed.
    Make sure you have links installed for the first 5 LED positions on the J9 header pins.
    Leave D5,  D6, and D7 links out. These are the 3 links nearest the Simm Socket position.
    Power the unit up via your plugpack or wall wart.
    If all is well, the power LED, LED-10 will light up.
    Press switch 2, then switch 3, these should make Data LEDs 3 and 4 light up.
    Check the heat sink for excessive heat. It should be mildly warm. If you have a multi-meter, you can check for +5V on the board. If the power LED is on and stable, this is a pretty good indication that the power section is alive and well.

    RS-232:
    You can now check the RS-232 section by hooking up the DB-9 connector to a comms port on your PC and running a terminal program such as hyperterm under W9x, etc.
    You must put a short between pins 2 and 3 of the micro at the 20 pin socket location. If you have used a machine pin socket, it's easy to push a resistor leg, or low value resistor (100R or less) into the socket. What you type into the comms program, should be "echoed' back to you with the link installed. Removing the link should stop this echo. You can check this at any speed, any data format, just make sure you have the correct comms port.

    You can use a standard 9 wire straight through cable for RS-232 connection to a PC Serial port.
    A null modem cable will not work.

    You can use Hyperterm to test the RS232, this works fine when  you set the handshake to none in the hyperterm properties.

We are rushing dt006 boards to Mark, the Author of Bascom-AVR, so he can put together a very nice piece of testing software for this board, in the meantime, you can try testing with "rotate.bas" for the LEDs and "strings.bas" for RS-232 testing. The method of programming using Bascom-AVR is covered in the programming  link.

Sample Electronics cable programmer schematic
From the help text of Bascom-AVR:
(This is what the DT006 is based on)

The simple cable programmer was submitted by Sample Electronics.
They produce professional programmers too. This simple programmer you can make yourself within a 10 minutes.
What you need is a DB25 centronics male connector, a flatcable and a connector that can be connected to the target MCU board.

The connections to make are as following:
DB25 pin Target MCU pin(AT90S8535) DT104
2, D0 MOSI, pin 6 J5, pin 4
4, D2 RESET, pin 9 J5, pin 8
5, D3 CLOCK, pin 8 J5, pin 6
11, BUSY MISO, pin 7 J5, pin 5
18-25,GND GROUND J5, pin 1

The MCU pin numbers are shown for an 8535!
Note that 18-25 means pins 18,19,20,21,22,23,24 and 25
You can use a small resistor of 100 ohm in series with the D0, D2 and D3 line in order not to short circuit your LPT port in the event the MCU pins are high.
But it was tested without these resistors and my PC still works :-)

Tip : when testing programmers etc. on the LPT it is best to buy an I/O card for your PC that has a LPT port. This way you dont destroy your LPT port that is on the motherboard in the event you make a mistake!

The following gif shows the connections to make. Both a setup for the DT104 and stand alone PCB are shown.
Sample Electronics cable programmer gif

Please Note **** This schematic is a simplistic circuit when a cable is connected to a dt104 board directly. The complete circuit is a 5 wire circuit that includes a ground connection as well as a reset connection between pin 4 of the DB-25 and pin 1 of the micro via pin 8 of the header and R3.



Subject:   Re DT006 AVR programming board.
   Date:    Tue, 18 Nov 2003 14:05:58 +0800
   From:    "David Chambers"  davmax at optusnet.com.au

Dear Don,

During some recent work burning chips I realised it might be wise to include a warning about operation.

To change a chip the board power has to be removed. If the parallel cable is connected to an operational computer the voltage on the pins of this connector are then higher than the DT006 power that is in fact 0 volts. This means that the input voltages to chips on the board may exceed the voltage rating limit for being above the supply. Certainly the power feeds back into the board power supply.  Likewise an external clock will create the same risk at the input pin of the microprocessor; again the voltage feeds into the power supply.

The best practice is to remove all external power before removing the board power. Likewise power up the board before external power sources.

Perhaps you have come across this before. Anyway you may be able to advise opinion that this perceived problem is not an issue.

DS & MG Chambers
Waterford. WA 6152


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